Tag Archives: Money on the move

Breaking news: Shelton lowers tuition proposal by $400; Students: ‘Yeah, got a few more thousand of those?’

Strangely enough, Shelton's newest tuition proposal came in the form of this gift (shown above) given to UA students.

By Shain Bergan

Some fresh news, as of just a few hours ago, courtesy of the Campus Correspondent:

Apparently University of Arizona President Robert Shelton has had a last minute change of heart from his original tuition proposal. Less than 24 hours before the next Arizona Board of Regents meeting, where tuition will be set, Shelton sent a memo to student government leaders and deans outlining his new plan, released at the 11th hour:

“Thus, I am amending UA’s tuition and mandatory fee recommendations for FY 2011, as

follows, to implement a scaled and moderated approach to moving UA’s tuition to the median of

our peers.

• Reducing the originally proposed $1,450 increase for resident undergraduate tuition at

UA main campus by $400 to $1,050;

• Reducing the originally proposed $1,450 increase for resident graduate tuition (UA Main

and UA South) by $400 to $1,050;

• Maintaining the $500 increase in resident undergraduate tuition at UA South as originally

proposed;

• Keeping the $2,000 increase in nonresident undergraduate and graduate tuition (UA

main campus and UA South) as originally proposed.”

It might be easy to applaud Shelton at this time, but something’s telling me the president may have had this move planned all along in order to gain favor with a campus that is becoming more and more disenfranchised with its leadership.

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The UA’s tuition hearing: A guest report

The world's oldest game has become a favorite among university leaders at the UA.

The following is a guest report written by Will Ferguson at Monday’s tuition hearing at the Harvill Building. Ferguson is currently an intern at the Tucson Weekly and is the former Arizona Daily Wildcat assistant news editor and administration beat writer.

Also, check out The Mad Fee Party’s official statement here, at the Desert Lamp.

By Will Ferguson

To call Monday night’s Arizona Board of Regents tuition hearing a packed house would be a serious understatement.

The small conference room in Harvill—where UA president Robert Shelton, Regent Rick Meyers (sitting in for the absent Regent Dennis DeConcini), student representatives and registered speakers addressed a row of video monitors—quickly filled up past capacity.

Forty-one registered speakers waited their turn to speak.  Many of them had to suffice with a letter to the Regents due to time constraints on the hearing.

Two additional rooms were opened in order to accommodate the multitude of students, faculty and community members who wanted to hear first-hand the reasoning behind a proposed tuition increase—a process that University of Arizona President Shelton said “has been transparent throughout the discussion.

  • Just another chance to blame the legislature for all the UA’s problems

“We had planned for and accepted a $40 million reduction in state funds,” Shelton said. “In reality, the UA has sustained a 100 million dollar cut, a 25 percent reduction—more than double what we had anticipated.

“We cannot further diminish the quality of the UA.”

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Tuition vs. net cost, and the question of financial aid

By Shain Bergan

Becky Pallack made an interesting post on her Campus Correspondent blog for the Arizona Daily Star on Tuesday.

Short but sweet, Pallack points out that while everyone is focused on the impending dramatic increase in University of Arizona tuition and fees, they may actually want to take a closer look at net cost of attendance—that is, the cost after the help typically provided by the UA Office of Financial Aid.

The post on the Campus Correspondent references these numbers as the Arizona Board of Regents’ figures for net tuition paid by the average UA student:

“2006-07 $1,297

2007-08 $1,801

2008-09 $1,977”

Here’s the interesting part: Pallack says that the net cost of attendance is rising even faster than the tuition sticker price. UA President Robert Shelton and ABOR’s defense of the rising tuition over the past several months has been that while tuition itself will rise, financial aid will increase even more, actually making UA attendance more affordable for the majority of students, especially those under or around the poverty level.

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Another round of UA Transformation cuts is all but certain at this point

Kudos to the Arizona Daily Star’s Becky Pallack for this report on how the University of Arizona would approach another round of budget cuts, if such a realization became reality (also check out Pallack’s blog, The Campus Correspondent, which is conveniently located on the WatchCat’s blogroll).

Pallack includes this toward the end of her post:

“With all of that in mind, the UA’s strategy for budget planning goes like this:

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State sales tax to be voted on in May (pending Senate approval)

Perhaps we may actually approach FY 2011 with some kind of pre-plan from FY2010…

The muchfrettedover current state budget crisis has had some twists and turns, but this may actually be a positive one.

An Arizona Senate committee has apparently voted to settle Gov. Jan Brewer’s call for a temporary additional 1-cent sales tax with the voters. The committee set a May 18 special election to let the voters decide if ponying up an extra cent is worth putting some kind of dent in the crisis that has held the state of Arizona captive since the Summer of 2009. Continue reading

ABOR, Day 1: The conflict between tuition and financial aid

A rather thin meeting in terms of content, but worthwhile nonetheless.

In the fashion that has become so popular as of late, the Arizona Board of Regents decided the “blame others first, do something later” approach to Arizona’s budget problems is right up their alley.

  • So what do you want? Lower tuition or more financial aid?

About halfway through Thursday’s Regents meeting, ABOR Chief Financial Officer Sandy Woodley and Regent Robert Bulla entered in a fundamental argument exchange with one another. After filleting the State of Arizona for not supplying the universities with enough money to run quality institutions, the Board switched gears (well not really, but kind of), with Regent Fred Boice saying, “I don’t think tuition should be impacted by family income, big or small.” The job of worrying about paying for college, he said, lies with financial aid.

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ABOR Preview: Legislative advice and the education blame game

Ah, it seems like just yesterday we were all pondering campus issues associated with the state budget crisis, the UA Transformation, graduation rates and the like. Now those issues are going to be addressed by the Arizona Board of Regents during its January meetings this Thursday and Friday from Arizona State University’s West campus. Expect for it to be live-streamed on ABOR’s official website, and, of course, we’ll have all the reaction, recap and analysis here for you following the conclusion of each day’s event.

Let’s go through what’s sure to be riveting material that is slated to be taken up by the Regents: